Tags

, ,


Hey all,

So yes, I missed a day of blogging, but not writing! – it has been the most exhausting week with conferences and long days, plus we’re preparing our school for moving, so… yea. Very draining. However, I have some fun additional news. The two books that I’ve been working on as an Educational Consultant have arrived! Nothing says success like diversity in your operations! (Plus, being able to say ‘Educational Consultant’ on a teacher’s resume is pretty cool.)

Remember to Preorder Iron Tribune through Amazon and Smashwords and check out my other novels, Brass Legionnaire and Copper Centurion! Also check out my Facebook Iron Tribune Release Party!

I look forward to seeing all your questions in two Fridays! Only a short ways away!

Here’s a brief snippet from Steel Praetorian to wet your whistle.

“Yes, indeed. It is good you recovered. Your second in command was not so… useful when we first met. Perhaps you will be more useful.” The Tumen snapped his fingers at one of the twins behind Alexandros. “Tea! We will drink tea. That is what civilized people drink, do they not?” Alexandros nodded hesitantly. They remained in silence for a few moments, until the guard returned with two cups and a steaming pot of tea. He silently poured a cup. The delicate porcelain was proffered to the Tumen, who accepted without acknowledgement. The second cup was poured and handed to Alexandros. He took the steaming cup, and thanked the man.

The servant/guard bowed slightly and disappeared behind Alexandros. Tomorbraatar raised his cup to his prisoner. “To conversation.” He sipped appreciatively. Alexandros raised his teacup as well, drinking silently. The warm liquid was delicious, the first warm drink he’d had in nearly two weeks.

“And now, Admiral, we have much to talk about. I wish to hear all about Rome.”

“I am afraid I cannot give you any information on military units or defenses near the capital.” Alexandros began, but stopped as Tomorbraatar held up his hand to forestall him.

“You misunderstand me. I wish to know about Rome, the city. It is a place I have always wanted to visit, and now that I have your captive attention” he chuckled at his own joke. “I shall take advantage of it!” And so, for hours, Alexandros spoke of Rome. He described the broad thoroughfares and the narrow alley shops. He spun a tale around the marble colonnades of the Forum and Senate House, and the manicured lawns and delicate fountains of the Imperial Palace. He illustrated the web of telegraph wires and the hum of the trolley cars as they criss-crossed the city.

For that entire time, Tomorbraatar was entranced. He listened carefully, asking probing questions that made Alexandros delve into his memories. The Roman remembered things once forgotten, and realized he hadn’t truly seen the city in many years. Tomorbraatar hadn’t seen it, but was experiencing it through Alexandros’ eyes. The man is a Latinophile. This could be quite useful for us, if I had the right leverage to convince him to support us.